Home » Blog » Yoga Business

Category: Yoga Business

Yogi Tones Podcast – Finding the Real Guru with Kat Da Silva

Today on the show is Kat Da Silva and we have some fun. Talking all things including yoga certifications and how you really don’t (kinda sorta) need one to teach yoga. People you wouldn’t expect to drop into a yoga class, who the real guru is, also farmers markets and how they can be a great place to spread your yoga love!!

Kat is a Passionate & Active Member of her Community – She knows no other way than Being the Change – being a Kickass Mom, Daughter, Sistah, Friend, and Human. She spends her time creating memories with her 12 year old son, teaching and living mindfulness, compassion, and embodiment through yoga, meditation, and other tools of self-reclamation. Kat finds deep pleasure in guiding her students in unlayering their stories and blocks, either on the mat or off, and holding the light while they discover their power, their peace, and the freedom of owning their bodies, their minds, and ultimately their lives. Kat believes in the power of community to create change and so she gives back by co-organizing events such as the Conscious San Jose Festival, serving in her local neighborhood committee driving anti-litter and beautification initiatives, and actively participating as a member of the Be the Change Collective. Kat’s future projects include bringing hope, guidance, and empowerment to moms through her Root to Rise Yoga & Lifestyle Coaching practice. Ultimately, Kat envisions a world where women heal, feel empowered, and see themselves wholly and deeply, allowing those around them to be just as deeply touched, loved, and transformed.



Special thanks to Kat for joining me on the show. Until next time!

Yogi Tones Podcast with Eman Zabi The Scribesmith

Eman Zabi is the copywriter and brand strategist behind The Scribesmith, where she crafts high-converting copy infused with personality and entertainment for brands that aren’t afraid to stand out.

Looking for an air-punching bottom line that doesn’t require you to sound like a corporate stooge?
She can help.

Connect with her!


  • To share your thoughts:

Teaching Yoga in the District of Columbia – Washington D.C.

When you first start looking into becoming a yoga teacher, it can be a little confusing to figure out what to do.  The most important thing to know about teaching yoga in Washington D.C. is that there is absolutely no regulation on yoga teachers.  This means that you do not need to be certified, registered, or licensed in order to hang a sign and start leading sun salutations.  In fact, some of the most experienced and well-known teachers in the country have never been certified, registered, or licensed.  That is because all of these are relatively recent concepts, especially in regards to teaching yoga.  When many of these teachers started teaching, there were no formal yoga teacher training programs. Your teacher might “certify” you to teach, but that was an arbitrary designation that did not imply a specific amount of training.

Certification 

Certification in Washington D.C. refers to the completion of a certain program of training according to the standards of that particular school.  There are no universal standards for certification, so two certified teachers from different schools can have completely different skill sets.  Most gyms and yoga studios require that you have a certification in order to teach there.  For some gyms and studios, a certification is all the credentials you need.  Others require you to be registered with the Yoga Alliance or have graduated from a Yoga Alliance approved training.  And some places require you to teach an “audition” class in addition to your credentials in order to more clearly see your skills in action.

Insurance

Most studios will require you to have insurance, the only reason they wouldn’t is that the studio has their own and it covers the teachers as well. Many will ask you to have it and make you an independent contractor. Although the threat of a liability lawsuit stemming from an injury in a yoga class may be relatively small, it is nonetheless real. Some of the common injuries reported by claimants include back injuries, joint or bone damage (i.e. bruises or fractures), strained or torn muscles, etc. Looking for insurance that works best for you? Comment below and we can update you on the best deals and fit for your teaching needs!

Registration

In order to bring some consistency to the market of teacher training programs, The Yoga Alliance was formed in 1997.  The Yoga Alliance sets minimum standards for teacher training programs.  Programs that meet these standards and pay a fee can market their trainings as “Yoga Alliance Approved”.  Graduates of these trainings can then register with the Yoga Alliance and then promote themselves as RYT – Registered Yoga Teachers.  Registration is available at 4 different levels: RYT 200, E-RYT 200, RYT 500, and E-RYT 500.  The E stands for experienced and indicates a certain number of hours teaching since the completion of teacher training.

Some employers require Yoga Alliance Registration and some do not. There is a a lively controversy regarding the value of the Yoga Alliance.  Some argue that their standards are too weak and unenforced. Others argue that yoga is a spiritual practice that should not be regulated at all.  This faction believes that regulation misses and stifles the best parts of yoga while subtly endorsing the commercialization of yoga.  Some people support the Yoga Alliance, stating that if we do not regulate ourselves, then the states will step in with regulation.

As it stands, registration is optional and the benefits of doing so are hotly debated.  However, most reputable teacher trainings are registered with the Yoga Alliance so it is likely that your training will qualify you to register.  You can go ahead and register right away if you feel that an extra credential will help your chances of getting a job, or you can wait and see if anyone asks for it.


Link to average salary according to Indeed website HERE

Hope this was a helpful.  If any of this information is incorrect or out of date, please comment below, and if you have any additional questions regarding teaching yoga in Washington D.C., leave a comment about that too. Also would love to hear how much you actually get paid to teach in Washington D.C. so people who are looking to teach here have an idea of what they are supposed to be paid. Thanks!

Want to check out a cool Yoga Map?! Go HERE and then Activity maps to see what I mean.


This post will be updated whenever anything new about teaching yoga in Washington D.C. comes up, so subscribe for updates. 

If you would like to be notified when our team has a yoga teaching opportunity in Washington D.C., fill out the form below and we will be in touch!

Teaching Form

If you are a yoga teacher or working towards becoming one, check out our resource page, you may find something helpful. Much love!!

Montana Yoga Teaching

When you first start looking into becoming a yoga teacher, it can be a little confusing to figure out what to do.  The most important thing to know about teaching yoga in the state of Montana is that there is absolutely no regulation on yoga teachers.  This means that you do not need to be certified, registered, or licensed in order to hang a sign and start leading sun salutations.  In fact, some of the most experienced and well-known teachers in the country have never been certified, registered, or licensed.  That is because all of these are relatively recent concepts, especially in regards to teaching yoga.  When many of these teachers started teaching, there were no formal yoga teacher training programs. Your teacher might “certify” you to teach, but that was an arbitrary designation that did not imply a specific amount of training.

Certification 

Certification in Montana refers to the completion of a certain program of training according to the standards of that particular school.  There are no universal standards for certification, so two certified teachers from different schools can have completely different skill sets.  Most gyms and yoga studios require that you have a certification in order to teach there.  For some gyms and studios, a certification is all the credentials you need.  Others require you to be registered with the Yoga Alliance or have graduated from a Yoga Alliance approved training.  And some places require you to teach an “audition” class in addition to your credentials in order to more clearly see your skills in action.

Insurance

Most studios will require you to have insurance, the only reason they wouldn’t is that the studio has their own and it covers the teachers as well. Many will ask you to have it and make you an independent contractor. Although the threat of a liability lawsuit stemming from an injury in a yoga class may be relatively small, it is nonetheless real. Some of the common injuries reported by claimants include back injuries, joint or bone damage (i.e. bruises or fractures), strained or torn muscles, etc. Looking for insurance that works best for you? Comment below and we can update you on the best deals and fit for your teaching needs!

Registration

In order to bring some consistency to the market of teacher training programs, The Yoga Alliance was formed in 1997.  The Yoga Alliance sets minimum standards for teacher training programs.  Programs that meet these standards and pay a fee can market their trainings as “Yoga Alliance Approved”.  Graduates of these trainings can then register with the Yoga Alliance and then promote themselves as RYT – Registered Yoga Teachers.  Registration is available at 4 different levels: RYT 200, E-RYT 200, RYT 500, and E-RYT 500.  The E stands for experienced and indicates a certain number of hours teaching since the completion of teacher training.

Some employers require Yoga Alliance Registration and some do not. There is a a lively controversy regarding the value of the Yoga Alliance.  Some argue that their standards are too weak and unenforced. Others argue that yoga is a spiritual practice that should not be regulated at all.  This faction believes that regulation misses and stifles the best parts of yoga while subtly endorsing the commercialization of yoga.  Some people support the Yoga Alliance, stating that if we do not regulate ourselves, then the states will step in with regulation.

As it stands, registration is optional and the benefits of doing so are hotly debated.  However, most reputable teacher trainings are registered with the Yoga Alliance so it is likely that your training will qualify you to register.  You can go ahead and register right away if you feel that an extra credential will help your chances of getting a job, or you can wait and see if anyone asks for it.


Link to average salary according to Glassdoor website HERE

Hope this was a helpful.  If any of this information is incorrect or out of date, please comment below, and if you have any additional questions regarding teaching yoga in Montana, leave a comment about that too. Also would love to hear how much you actually get paid to teach in Montana so people who are looking to teach here have an idea of what they are supposed to be paid. Thanks!

Want to check out a cool Yoga Map?! Go HERE and then Activity maps to see what I mean.


This post will be updated whenever anything new about teaching yoga in Montana comes up, so subscribe for updates. 

If you would like to be notified when our team has a yoga teaching opportunity in Montana, fill out the form below and we will be in touch!

Teaching Form

If you are a yoga teacher or working towards becoming one, check out our resource page, you may find something helpful. Much love!!

Yogi Tones Podcast with Gianna Wozney – Helping People Stand!

Gianna Wozney is a yoga teacher based out of New Jersey. She did her teacher training in Paia, Maui at the Maui Yoga Shala. Teaching for two years, Gianna has been running her own business since she returned from the island. Traveling around from gym, to wellness center, to chiropractic office, to library to anywhere Gianna has been spreading her passion for yoga to everyone ages 3 months to 89 years old! 

Her yoga philosophy is all about staying true to you and working to better yourself- mentally, physically and emotionally and her passion is spreading knowledge to people who think that there is no more to learn about themselves. 
 
You can find her on instagram @mauiyogawg, on facebook or on her website at yogawithgianna.com
 

Arizona Yoga Teaching

When you first start looking into becoming a yoga teacher, it can be a little confusing to figure out what to do.  The most important thing to know about teaching yoga in Arizona is that there is absolutely no regulation on yoga teachers.  This means that you do not need to be certified, registered, or licensed in order to hang a sign and start leading sun salutations.  In fact, some of the most experienced and well-known teachers in the country have never been certified, registered, or licensed.  That is because all of these are relatively recent concepts, especially in regards to teaching yoga.  When many of these teachers started teaching, there were no formal yoga teacher training programs. Your teacher might “certify” you to teach, but that was an arbitrary designation that did not imply a specific amount of training.

Certification 

Certification in Arizona refers to the completion of a certain program of training according to the standards of that particular school.  There are no universal standards for certification, so two certified teachers from different schools can have completely different skill sets.  Most gyms and yoga studios require that you have a certification in order to teach there.  For some gyms and studios, a certification is all the credentials you need.  Others require you to be registered with the Yoga Alliance or have graduated from a Yoga Alliance approved training.  And some places require you to teach an “audition” class in addition to your credentials in order to more clearly see your skills in action.

Insurance

Most studios will require you to have insurance, the only reason they wouldn’t is that the studio has their own and it covers the teachers as well. Many will ask you to have it and make you an independent contractor. Although the threat of a liability lawsuit stemming from an injury in a yoga class may be relatively small, it is nonetheless real. Some of the common injuries reported by claimants include back injuries, joint or bone damage (i.e. bruises or fractures), strained or torn muscles, etc. Looking for insurance that works best for you? Comment below and we can update you on the best deals and fit for your teaching needs!

Registration

In order to bring some consistency to the market of teacher training programs, The Yoga Alliance was formed in 1997.  The Yoga Alliance sets minimum standards for teacher training programs.  Programs that meet these standards and pay a fee can market their trainings as “Yoga Alliance Approved”.  Graduates of these trainings can then register with the Yoga Alliance and then promote themselves as RYT – Registered Yoga Teachers.  Registration is available at 4 different levels: RYT 200, E-RYT 200, RYT 500, and E-RYT 500.  The E stands for experienced and indicates a certain number of hours teaching since the completion of teacher training.

Some employers require Yoga Alliance Registration and some do not. There is a a lively controversy regarding the value of the Yoga Alliance.  Some argue that their standards are too weak and unenforced. Others argue that yoga is a spiritual practice that should not be regulated at all.  This faction believes that regulation misses and stifles the best parts of yoga while subtly endorsing the commercialization of yoga.  Some people support the Yoga Alliance, stating that if we do not regulate ourselves, then the states will step in with regulation.

As it stands, registration is optional and the benefits of doing so are hotly debated.  However, most reputable teacher trainings are registered with the Yoga Alliance so it is likely that your training will qualify you to register.  You can go ahead and register right away if you feel that an extra credential will help your chances of getting a job, or you can wait and see if anyone asks for it.


Link to average salary according to Indeed website HERE

Hope this was a helpful.  If any of this information is incorrect or out of date, please comment below, and if you have any additional questions regarding teaching yoga in Arizona, leave a comment about that too. Also would love to hear how much you actually get paid to teach in Arizona so people who are looking to teach here have an idea of what they are supposed to be paid. Thanks!

Want to check out a cool Yoga Map?! Go HERE and then Activity Maps to see what I mean.


This post will be updated whenever anything new about teaching yoga in Arizona comes up, so subscribe for updates. 

If you would like to be notified when our team has a yoga teaching opportunity in Arizona, fill out the form below and we will be in touch!

Teaching Form

If you are a yoga teacher or working towards becoming one, check out our resource page, you may find something helpful. Much love!!

Washington Yoga Teaching

When you first start looking into becoming a yoga teacher, it can be a little confusing to figure out what to do.  The most important thing to know about teaching yoga in the state of Washington is that there is absolutely no regulation on yoga teachers.  This means that you do not need to be certified, registered, or licensed in order to hang a sign and start leading sun salutations.  In fact, some of the most experienced and well-known teachers in the country have never been certified, registered, or licensed.  That is because all of these are relatively recent concepts, especially in regards to teaching yoga.  When many of these teachers started teaching, there were no formal yoga teacher training programs. Your teacher might “certify” you to teach, but that was an arbitrary designation that did not imply a specific amount of training.

Certification 

Certification in Washington refers to the completion of a certain program of training according to the standards of that particular school.  There are no universal standards for certification, so two certified teachers from different schools can have completely different skill sets.  Most gyms and yoga studios require that you have a certification in order to teach there.  For some gyms and studios, a certification is all the credentials you need.  Others require you to be registered with the Yoga Alliance or have graduated from a Yoga Alliance approved training.  And some places require you to teach an “audition” class in addition to your credentials in order to more clearly see your skills in action.

Insurance

Most studios will require you to have insurance, the only reason they wouldn’t is that the studio has their own and it covers the teachers as well. Many will ask you to have it and make you an independent contractor. Although the threat of a liability lawsuit stemming from an injury in a yoga class may be relatively small, it is nonetheless real. Some of the common injuries reported by claimants include back injuries, joint or bone damage (i.e. bruises or fractures), strained or torn muscles, etc. Looking for insurance that works best for you? Comment below and we can update you on the best deals and fit for your teaching needs!

Registration

In order to bring some consistency to the market of teacher training programs, The Yoga Alliance was formed in 1997.  The Yoga Alliance sets minimum standards for teacher training programs.  Programs that meet these standards and pay a fee can market their trainings as “Yoga Alliance Approved”.  Graduates of these trainings can then register with the Yoga Alliance and then promote themselves as RYT – Registered Yoga Teachers.  Registration is available at 4 different levels: RYT 200, E-RYT 200, RYT 500, and E-RYT 500.  The E stands for experienced and indicates a certain number of hours teaching since the completion of teacher training.

Some employers require Yoga Alliance Registration and some do not. There is a a lively controversy regarding the value of the Yoga Alliance.  Some argue that their standards are too weak and unenforced. Others argue that yoga is a spiritual practice that should not be regulated at all.  This faction believes that regulation misses and stifles the best parts of yoga while subtly endorsing the commercialization of yoga.  Some people support the Yoga Alliance, stating that if we do not regulate ourselves, then the states will step in with regulation.

As it stands, registration is optional and the benefits of doing so are hotly debated.  However, most reputable teacher trainings are registered with the Yoga Alliance so it is likely that your training will qualify you to register.  You can go ahead and register right away if you feel that an extra credential will help your chances of getting a job, or you can wait and see if anyone asks for it.


Link to average salary according to Indeed website HERE

Hope this was a helpful.  If any of this information is incorrect or out of date, please comment below, and if you have any additional questions regarding teaching yoga in Washington, leave a comment about that too. Also would love to hear how much you actually get paid to teach in Washington so people who are looking to teach here have an idea of what they are supposed to be paid. Thanks!

Want to check out a cool Yoga Map?! Go HERE and then Activity maps to see what I mean.


This post will be updated whenever anything new about teaching yoga in Washington comes up, so subscribe for updates. 

If you would like to be notified when our team has a yoga teaching opportunity in Washington, fill out the form below and we will be in touch!

Teaching Form

If you are a yoga teacher or working towards becoming one, check out our resource page, you may find something helpful. Much love!!

Oregon Yoga Teaching

When you first start looking into becoming a yoga teacher, it can be a little confusing to figure out what to do.  The most important thing to know about teaching yoga in the state of Oregon is that there is absolutely no regulation on yoga teachers.  This means that you do not need to be certified, registered, or licensed in order to hang a sign and start leading sun salutations.  In fact, some of the most experienced and well-known teachers in the country have never been certified, registered, or licensed.  That is because all of these are relatively recent concepts, especially in regards to teaching yoga.  When many of these teachers started teaching, there were no formal yoga teacher training programs. Your teacher might “certify” you to teach, but that was an arbitrary designation that did not imply a specific amount of training.

Certification 

Certification in Oregon refers to the completion of a certain program of training according to the standards of that particular school.  There are no universal standards for certification, so two certified teachers from different schools can have completely different skill sets.  Most gyms and yoga studios require that you have a certification in order to teach there.  For some gyms and studios, a certification is all the credentials you need.  Others require you to be registered with the Yoga Alliance or have graduated from a Yoga Alliance approved training.  And some places require you to teach an “audition” class in addition to your credentials in order to more clearly see your skills in action.

Insurance

Most studios will require you to have insurance, the only reason they wouldn’t is that the studio has their own and it covers the teachers as well. Many will ask you to have it and make you an independent contractor. Although the threat of a liability lawsuit stemming from an injury in a yoga class may be relatively small, it is nonetheless real. Some of the common injuries reported by claimants include back injuries, joint or bone damage (i.e. bruises or fractures), strained or torn muscles, etc. Looking for insurance that works best for you? Comment below and we can update you on the best deals and fit for your teaching needs!

Registration

In order to bring some consistency to the market of teacher training programs, The Yoga Alliance was formed in 1997.  The Yoga Alliance sets minimum standards for teacher training programs.  Programs that meet these standards and pay a fee can market their trainings as “Yoga Alliance Approved”.  Graduates of these trainings can then register with the Yoga Alliance and then promote themselves as RYT – Registered Yoga Teachers.  Registration is available at 4 different levels: RYT 200, E-RYT 200, RYT 500, and E-RYT 500.  The E stands for experienced and indicates a certain number of hours teaching since the completion of teacher training.

Some employers require Yoga Alliance Registration and some do not. There is a a lively controversy regarding the value of the Yoga Alliance.  Some argue that their standards are too weak and unenforced. Others argue that yoga is a spiritual practice that should not be regulated at all.  This faction believes that regulation misses and stifles the best parts of yoga while subtly endorsing the commercialization of yoga.  Some people support the Yoga Alliance, stating that if we do not regulate ourselves, then the states will step in with regulation.

As it stands, registration is optional and the benefits of doing so are hotly debated.  However, most reputable teacher trainings are registered with the Yoga Alliance so it is likely that your training will qualify you to register.  You can go ahead and register right away if you feel that an extra credential will help your chances of getting a job, or you can wait and see if anyone asks for it.


Link to average salary according to Glassdoor website HERE

Hope this was a helpful.  If any of this information is incorrect or out of date, please comment below, and if you have any additional questions regarding teaching yoga in Oregon, leave a comment about that too. Also would love to hear how much you actually get paid to teach in Oregon so people who are looking to teach here have an idea of what they are supposed to be paid. Thanks!

Want to check out a cool Yoga Map?! Go HERE and then Activity maps to see it!


This post will be updated whenever anything new about teaching yoga in Oregon comes up, so subscribe for updates. 

If you would like to be notified when our team has a yoga teaching opportunity in Oregon, fill out the form below and we will be in touch!

Teaching Form

If you are a yoga teacher or working towards becoming one, check out our resource page, you may find something helpful. Much love!!

 

Alaska Yoga Teaching

When you first start looking into becoming a yoga teacher, it can be a little confusing to figure out what to do.  The most important thing to know about teaching yoga in the state of Alaska is that there is absolutely no regulation on yoga teachers.  This means that you do not need to be certified, registered, or licensed in order to hang a sign and start leading sun salutations.  In fact, some of the most experienced and well-known teachers in the country have never been certified, registered, or licensed.  That is because all of these are relatively recent concepts, especially in regards to teaching yoga.  When many of these teachers started teaching, there were no formal yoga teacher training programs. Your teacher might “certify” you to teach, but that was an arbitrary designation that did not imply a specific amount of training.

Certification 

Certification in Alaska refers to the completion of a certain program of training according to the standards of that particular school.  There are no universal standards for certification, so two certified teachers from different schools can have completely different skill sets.  Most gyms and yoga studios require that you have a certification in order to teach there.  For some gyms and studios, a certification is all the credentials you need.  Others require you to be registered with the Yoga Alliance or have graduated from a Yoga Alliance approved training.  And some places require you to teach an “audition” class in addition to your credentials in order to more clearly see your skills in action.

Insurance

Most studios will require you to have insurance, the only reason they wouldn’t is that the studio has their own and it covers the teachers as well. Many will ask you to have it and make you an independent contractor. Although the threat of a liability lawsuit stemming from an injury in a yoga class may be relatively small, it is nonetheless real. Some of the common injuries reported by claimants include back injuries, joint or bone damage (i.e. bruises or fractures), strained or torn muscles, etc. Looking for insurance that works best for you? Comment below and we can update you on the best deals and fit for your teaching needs!

Registration

In order to bring some consistency to the market of teacher training programs, The Yoga Alliance was formed in 1997.  The Yoga Alliance sets minimum standards for teacher training programs.  Programs that meet these standards and pay a fee can market their trainings as “Yoga Alliance Approved”.  Graduates of these trainings can then register with the Yoga Alliance and then promote themselves as RYT – Registered Yoga Teachers.  Registration is available at 4 different levels: RYT 200, E-RYT 200, RYT 500, and E-RYT 500.  The E stands for experienced and indicates a certain number of hours teaching since the completion of teacher training.

Some employers require Yoga Alliance Registration and some do not. There is a a lively controversy regarding the value of the Yoga Alliance.  Some argue that their standards are too weak and unenforced. Others argue that yoga is a spiritual practice that should not be regulated at all.  This faction believes that regulation misses and stifles the best parts of yoga while subtly endorsing the commercialization of yoga.  Some people support the Yoga Alliance, stating that if we do not regulate ourselves, then the states will step in with regulation.

As it stands, registration is optional and the benefits of doing so are hotly debated.  However, most reputable teacher trainings are registered with the Yoga Alliance so it is likely that your training will qualify you to register.  You can go ahead and register right away if you feel that an extra credential will help your chances of getting a job, or you can wait and see if anyone asks for it.


Link to average salary according to Ideafit website HERE

Hope this was a helpful.  If any of this information is incorrect or out of date, please comment below, and if you have any additional questions regarding teaching yoga in Alaska, leave a comment about that too. Also would love to hear how much you actually get paid to teach in Alaska so people who are looking to teach here have an idea of what they are supposed to be paid. Thanks!

Want to check out a cool Yoga Map?! Go HERE and then Activity maps to see what I mean.


This post will be updated whenever anything new about teaching yoga in Alaska comes up, so subscribe for updates. 

If you would like to be notified when our team has a yoga teaching opportunity in Alaska, fill out the form below and we will be in touch!

Teaching Form

If you are a yoga teacher or working towards becoming one, check out our resource page, you may find something helpful. Much love!!

Wyoming Yoga Teaching

When you first start looking into becoming a yoga teacher, it can be a little confusing to figure out what to do.  The most important thing to know about teaching yoga in the state of Wyoming is that there is absolutely no regulation on yoga teachers.  This means that you do not need to be certified, registered, or licensed in order to hang a sign and start leading sun salutations.  In fact, some of the most experienced and well-known teachers in the country have never been certified, registered, or licensed.  That is because all of these are relatively recent concepts, especially in regards to teaching yoga.  When many of these teachers started teaching, there were no formal yoga teacher training programs. Your teacher might “certify” you to teach, but that was an arbitrary designation that did not imply a specific amount of training.

Certification 

Certification in Wyoming refers to the completion of a certain program of training according to the standards of that particular school.  There are no universal standards for certification, so two certified teachers from different schools can have completely different skill sets.  Most gyms and yoga studios require that you have a certification in order to teach there.  For some gyms and studios, a certification is all the credentials you need.  Others require you to be registered with the Yoga Alliance or have graduated from a Yoga Alliance approved training.  And some places require you to teach an “audition” class in addition to your credentials in order to more clearly see your skills in action.

Insurance

Most studios will require you to have insurance, the only reason they wouldn’t is that the studio has their own and it covers the teachers as well. Many will ask you to have it and make you an independent contractor. Although the threat of a liability lawsuit stemming from an injury in a yoga class may be relatively small, it is nonetheless real. Some of the common injuries reported by claimants include back injuries, joint or bone damage (i.e. bruises or fractures), strained or torn muscles, etc. Looking for insurance that works best for you? Comment below and we can update you on the best deals and fit for your teaching needs!

Registration

In order to bring some consistency to the market of teacher training programs, The Yoga Alliance was formed in 1997.  The Yoga Alliance sets minimum standards for teacher training programs.  Programs that meet these standards and pay a fee can market their trainings as “Yoga Alliance Approved”.  Graduates of these trainings can then register with the Yoga Alliance and then promote themselves as RYT – Registered Yoga Teachers.  Registration is available at 4 different levels: RYT 200, E-RYT 200, RYT 500, and E-RYT 500.  The E stands for experienced and indicates a certain number of hours teaching since the completion of teacher training.

Some employers require Yoga Alliance Registration and some do not. There is a a lively controversy regarding the value of the Yoga Alliance.  Some argue that their standards are too weak and unenforced. Others argue that yoga is a spiritual practice that should not be regulated at all.  This faction believes that regulation misses and stifles the best parts of yoga while subtly endorsing the commercialization of yoga.  Some people support the Yoga Alliance, stating that if we do not regulate ourselves, then the states will step in with regulation.

As it stands, registration is optional and the benefits of doing so are hotly debated.  However, most reputable teacher trainings are registered with the Yoga Alliance so it is likely that your training will qualify you to register.  You can go ahead and register right away if you feel that an extra credential will help your chances of getting a job, or you can wait and see if anyone asks for it.


Wasn’t able to find an average pay for yoga teachers in Wyoming, if you have an idea leave a comment about it below!

Hope this was a helpful.  If any of this information is incorrect or out of date, please comment below, and if you have any additional questions regarding teaching yoga in Wyoming, leave a comment about that too. Also would love to hear how much you actually get paid to teach in Wyoming so people who are looking to teach here have an idea of what they are supposed to be paid. Thanks!

Want to check out a cool Yoga Map?! Go HERE and then Activity maps to see what I mean.


This post will be updated whenever anything new about teaching yoga in Wyoming comes up, so subscribe for updates. 

If you would like to be notified when our team has a yoga teaching opportunity in Wyoming, fill out the form below and we will be in touch!

Teaching Form

If you are a yoga teacher or working towards becoming one, check out our resource page, you may find something helpful. Much love!!